Futile Hello World Cheat Sheet


I’ve been playing around with Futile (a 2D framework for Unity) — including my last Ludum Dare entry. There’s not a ton of documentation and examples out there on the web (other than the source, which has most of what you need), and one thing I’ve run into a couple of times now is just setting up a new project. There are videos on the main futile site, but I personally can’t stand video tutorials (no way to search, usually go to slow, etc, etc). There’s also a great multi-part tutorial someone wrote about making Pong using Futile, but that one is a bit wordy and hand-holding (as it’s also explaining Futile as it goes). What I want is a really dead-simple cheat sheet for starting a new project, so here it is:

  1. Open up Unity and choose File -> New Project.
  2. Right click on “Main Camera” and delete it (you don’t need it).
  3. Either download the Futile zip, check it out from github, or copy it over from another project and put the entire Futile folder in your Assets folder.
  4. Make Resources and Scripts folders in your Assets folder (not strictly required but seems like a good convention) and copy any boilerplate code into your scripts folder (I re-use my base screen class and my asset loader)
  5. Switch back over to Unity and let it import all your scripts. Choose Game Object -> Create Empty from the menu. Change the name of this object to something more descriptive (not required, but helpful. i usually do “Futile” or the name of the game).
  6. Select the new game object and add the Futile Script as a component.
  7. Create a new MonoBehavior called YourApp.cs and attach it to the same node.
  8. Within the Start function of your app, paste in the Futile boilerplate setup code:
FutileParams fparams = new FutileParams(true,true,true,true);  //landscape left, right, portrait, portraitUpsideDown
fparams.AddResolutionLevel(480.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, ""); //max height, displayScale, resourceScale, resourceSuffix
fparams.origin = new Vector2(0.5f,0.5f);
Futile.instance.Init (fparams); 
Debug.Log("HELLO WORLD"); //just so we know it worked!

That’s it! Now you should be able to build (and get a blank screen). You may also need to muck with your build settings  a bit depending on what platforms you’re targeting, but at this point your project is set up and ready to go.

 

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